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China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

  
Pinoys in Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan Thread, China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines in Working or Living Abroad; It what may be a coincidence, China Daily has photos of a Chinese police unit training to end a hostage ...
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  #21  
Old 08-26-2010, 01:29 AM
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Default Re: China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

It what may be a coincidence, China Daily has photos of a Chinese police unit training to end a hostage situation involving a bus that looks very much like the bus involved in the Manila incident. The text with the photos indicate the exercise occurred Tuesday.
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  #22  
Old 08-26-2010, 01:41 AM
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Hatred toward Filipinos 'smacks of racism' — Hong Kong daily

JERRIE M. ABELLA, GMANews.TV
08/25/2010 | 10:02 PM

A newspaper in Hong Kong on Wednesday sought to ease the reported resentment felt by Chinese nationals toward Filipinos in light of the hostage crisis in Manila that left eight tourists from China’s special administrative region dead.

In its editorial Wednesday, the South China Morning Post said Filipinos are the “wrong targets" of the collective anger although it described the police force that handled Monday’s hostage situation as “incompetent."

“The actions of a unit of police commandos were not [the Filipinos’] doing. Tarring them with the same brush of incompetence isn’t right," the editorial read, adding that venting anger toward Filipinos “smacks of racism."

The editorial also scored the Hong Kong government’s response to the tragedy after placing the Philippines on its travel blacklist.

“It has issued its highest travel alert for those thinking of going to the Philippines. Based on a single isolated incident, it has determined that a severe threat exists and that all travel should be avoided," it said.



The editorial explained that the only other countries on the alert list – Indonesia, Iran, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia and Thailand – are ranked two levels lower, with travelers advised to “exercise caution."

The Security Bureau of Hong Kong issued a travel warning on Monday, discouraging all travel to the Philippines by its citizens.

Just an hour after the hostage-taking ended, the Philippines’ status was changed by Hong Kong from an “amber alert warning" to a “black alert warning," indicating severe threats to the country’s security.

“Travel bans are for safety, not political retribution," the SCMP editorial stated.

It likewise faulted protesters in Hong Kong who rallied outside the Philippine Consulate General there for the “abuse" hurled against Philippine President Benigno Aquino III in blog postings and placards.

The editorial cited a placard that read “Cold-blooded Aquino – Go to hell."

“Statements like this are not rational or reasonable. All they do is stir needless hatred," it said.

The newspaper, which has a daily circulation of over 100,000, urged Chinese nationals not to place blame for the hostage drama to Filipinos, which it described as “innocent bystanders" to the tragedy.

“The 150,000 Filipinos who live among us in Hong Kong and the untold millions in the Philippines who rely on our business and tourism dollars cannot provide what we want to know. They are as much innocent bystanders to the tragedy as we are and deserve to be treated as such," the editorial said
. - KBK, GMANews.TV
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Old 08-26-2010, 01:54 AM
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Default Re: China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

Filipinos Taking Photos At Hostage Scene, Chinese Reactions

45 comments by Fauna on Wednesday, August 25, 2010


Philippine police taking photos at scene of Hong Kong tourist catastrophe

Philippine police smile and take photographs in front of the bus where Hong Kong tourists met catastrophe



Phoenix Television’s August 25th “Zao Ban Che” ["Phoenix Morning Commute"?] program broadcasted “Philippine police taking photos at scene of Hong Kong tourist catastrophe”, with the following text below:
Yang Juan: This bullet-ridden, blood-stained tour bus is still parked in its original place [during the hostage crisis]. Just yesterday, the family members of the Hong Kong hostages came to the scene to offer sacrifices/pay their respects, the scene very touching.
However, at the same time, the bus was unexpectedly being treated as a tourist sight by people. The photograph we see here is of Philippine police at the scene taking photographs as souvenirs, smiles on their faces, as if what was behind them was some famous sight.



Philippine schoolgirls taking group photographs in front of the disabled bus involved in the hostage crisis.



Philippine schoolgirls taking group photographs in front of the disabled bus involved in the hostage crisis.



August 24th afternoon, Manila, the Philippines, many city residents at the hijacked Hong Kong tour bus looking on.



August 24th afternoon, Manila, the Philippines, many city residents at the hijacked Hong Kong tour bus looking on and taking pictures.



August 24th afternoon, Manila, the Philippines, many city residents at the hijacked Hong Kong tour bus looking on and taking pictures.


Comments from ifeng:
江苏省苏州市网友:
[Taking photos] To remember what? To remember Chinese people being killed, or the Philippines failure? Inhuman!!!
四川省成都市网友:
From the Filipino police smiling and taking photos, what we see is a lack of humanity! To be blunt: Just a bunch of creatures worse than pigs and dogs!!!
青海省西宁市网友:
No conscientious, self-respecting Chinese person should go to this trash country for tourism, buy products made by this trash country, or hire the people of this trash country.
重庆市网友:
Just what kind of country is this???!!! The Philippines! Treating life as cheap! Not taking things seriously! Strongly condemn the Philippine government and those nonchalant police and the insensitive bystanders!!! Strongly condemn and protest!!!
北京市网友:
Think of it from another angle: Their generation is a generation of servants, so this incident will probably give their base psychology a kind of satisfaction.
浙江省台州市网友:
The Philippine president is inhuman, the police even more so, and even the ordinary common Filipinos are likewise callous. This kind of callous country deserves to be destroyed!
My heartfelt condolences to the Hong Kong victims! We are all Chinese people, and at this moment, everyone’s heart is heavy!
广东省深圳市宝安区网友:
They essentially did not see the Chinese hostages as people! If the hostages were people of other countries, the result wouldn’t have been like this. Angry, angry???
上海市网友:
It is clear what place China occupies in their minds!
上海市杨浦区网友:
Taking photos at the victims’ scene is already disgraceful, but adding those the ugly faces of those young Filipino girls, it is even more disgusting.
浙江省温州市网友:
All of a sudden, the shameless of the Philippines as a country is revealed.
北京市网友:
Might as well not tow it away, having it become a tourist attraction is okay too, to represent the shame of the Philippines!!!
广东省佛山市网友:
Seeing their smiles, I think of how the day of mourning they organized cannot possibly be mourning foreigners, so can they be mourning the gunman? Who will the Philippine citizens truly mourn in their hearts? Hard to imagine.
北京市网友:
A happy tourist destination [referring to the Philippines], but just because a group of “Chinese” tourists died, and just like when the American military is attacked in Iraq/Afghanistan, it is now laughed at and made fun of by Chinese people, humanity twisted! China’s sad soul…
无线网友:
Think of the Chinese people’s sick cheering during 9/11, and the various behaviors of the the Philippine people can be well understood, this is the moral decay of nationalistic crowds!
安徽省网友:
Filipinos are a bunch of inhuman cold-blooded animals.
Comments from Mop:
开舒克的贝塔:
You think there are less of these kind of people in China?
Look at the crowds of bystanders whenever something happens…how many of them are being sympathetic?
Some people…only have other people in their eyes, never looking at themselves.
The source of comments are at Filipinos Taking Photos At Hostage Scene, Chinese Reactions – chinaSMACK
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  #24  
Old 08-26-2010, 02:19 AM
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Default Re: China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

Manila Response Shows Pressure on Beijing

Wall Street Journal 8/25/2010


Chinese tourists in Manila leave their hotel Tuesday after China’s government warned citizens to exercise caution in the Philippines.


China’s state media continued Wednesday to give big play to the killings of Hong Kong tourists in Manila, in particular trumpeting the official response from Beijing.

“Hu Jintao, Wen Jiabao, Xi Jinping Send Condolences to Families of the Hong Kong Compatriots Killed in Manila Hijacking Incident and to Injured Compatriots” reads the headline of the top story on the front page of Wednesday’s People’s Daily, the Communist Party mouthpiece. Other media flag a call made by Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi to his Philippine counterpart shortly after the incident to say that “The Chinese side requires the Philippine side to completely investigate the incident, report related details as soon as possible, try its best to rescue the injured and properly handle the aftermath.”

A Foreign Ministry statement said that Beijing has also sent a working group to Manila to assist the Chinese embassy there in handling the case, and that Yang also told his counterpart that China “requires the Philippines to take tangible measures to ensure the safety of life and property of Chinese citizens in the country.”

China’s official response, in addition to reflect the no-doubt sincere sympathies of the leadership, also shows the growing public pressure Beijing is under to demonstrate its willingness and ability to protect its citizens overseas. As China’s wealth and global reach increase, more and more Chinese are naturally traveling abroad for tourism or commercial purposes — and becoming exposed to the dangers as well, whether they’re tourists sightseeing in Manila or workers on oil projects in Africa.

At the same time, the expectations and demands that many Chinese have of their government — and the willingness to express those expectations and demands on the Internet — are growing, forcing the government to respond. To cite one example, the Foreign Ministry went to great lengths in 2006 to explain its efforts to protect ethnic Chinese affected by anti-Chinese riots in the Solomon Islands. In that case Beijing’s efforts also served to flex its diplomatic muscles against rival Taiwan.

Andrew Erickson, an associate professor in the Strategic Research Department at the U.S. Naval War College, argues that Beijing’s efforts to protect Chinese overseas are likely to increase. In an article published this month titled “Looking After China’s Own: Pressure to Protect PRC Citizens Working Overseas Likely to Rise,” he says that “Several factors increase the likelihood that the Chinese government may be more able and willing to respond with force to future hostage situations or other targeted violence against PRC citizens.”

They include the growing strength of the Chinese navy and the “Chinese leadership’s increasingly assertive worldview as the country emerges strongly from the deep global economic recession.”

In the case of this week’s tragedy in Manila, China is hardly likely to send its navy to the Philippines — but some Chinese have indicated support for that. The widespread public anger over the Philippine government’s handling of the incident has also led some commentators to call for stronger action from Beijing.

One widely circulated post on Sina’s microblogging service refers to an incident in 1911 when the Qing Dynasty, the author says, dispatched a gunboat to Mexico in the wake of anti-Chinese riots there, eliciting an apology from the Mexican government.

– Jason Dean

Manila Response Shows Pressure on Beijing - China Real Time Report - WSJ
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  #25  
Old 08-26-2010, 04:57 AM
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Default Re: China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

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Originally Posted by hfl View Post
Filipinos Taking Photos At Hostage Scene, Chinese Reactions
The source of comments are at Filipinos Taking Photos At Hostage Scene, Chinese Reactions – chinaSMACK
I find it hard to go through all the comments as I couldn't bear the dreadful feeling reading some of those harsh comments.

Hope time will eventually heal the wounds.

Peace.
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Old 08-26-2010, 05:13 AM
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Default Re: China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

Quote:
Originally Posted by dodong View Post
I do feel it is a blunder but I don't feel it's so much of a diplomacy blunder.

While I think with so many lives from Hong Kong in danger and eventually lost, and with hundreds of thousands of Filipinos employed in Hong Kong, he should not have snubbed the phone call from Hong Kong chief, diplomacy wise the chief of Hong Kong, a highly autonamous region in China(Special Administrative Region as China calls it) is more like an equivalent of a province governor in the Philippines so I suspect that's why Aquino didn't answer his phone as he probably didn't realize situation would go this bad eventually, or his staff somehow didn't let him answer.
According to reports, Hong Kong newspapers carried Tsang’s statement saying Monday, he had been trying to contact Aquino “since 4pm ..but all efforts failed.” He said the way the Aquino government handled the hostage situation was “regrettable” and “disappointing.”

Told about Tsang’s statement, Aquino said he did not know about Tsang’s call and that nobody told him about it.

Inquiries about the incident revealed that while the hostage situation was going on, Aquino was closely monitoring it, and he was talking with police authorities constantly. He told his staff that he won’t be taking any calls unless it’s extremely important.

When Tsang called, the one who took the call didn’t know who Donald Tsang is. Following the instruction, the staff member did not pass on the call to Aquino.
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Old 08-26-2010, 05:22 AM
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Default Re: China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

I found the explanation amusing. The Chinese would have to have the same IQ as Manila District Police to believe it.

Yes Aquino's staff didn't know who Donald Tsong was, but he should have known what 'Chief of Hong Kong' is, right?

According to your report, Mr. Tsong tried to reach Aquino multiple times, during and after the incident, so Tsong never gave his title, and the same moron from Aquino's staff members answered the phone call every single time by snubbing the Hong Kong chief?
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Old 08-26-2010, 08:14 AM
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Default Re: China reaction on the tourist hostage carnage in the Philippines

The bodies of the 8 tourists killed have been flown back to Hong Kong. The Chinese Ambassador paid respect to the dead at Manila airport:

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For more photos of the incident, visit OFW Forum Gallery at

Tourist hostage crisis in Philippines-9 dead - Part 5(Photos/Images) - Forum Photo Gallery - Overseas Filipino Worker Community
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  #29  
Old 08-26-2010, 11:24 AM
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Souvenir photos in front of bullet-riddled bus irk Hong Kong folk

By Christian V. Esguerra
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 02:26:00 08/26/2010

MANILA, Philippines—As if the bungled hostage rescue operation wasn’t bad enough, Filipinos infuriated critics—especially Hong Kong nationals—even more by posing in front of the bullet-riddled tourist bus in Luneta Park for souvenir photos.

At least two such pictures are now circulating via the popular social networking site Facebook. One shows a group of four policemen in full uniform having their photo taken by a colleague the morning after the 11-hour hostage drama.

The other photo shows eight female college students posing before a cell phone camera being held by a schoolmate.

“How come they can still take pictures under this situation?” Arion Fong asked in disbelief in his Facebook comment on the second photo. “I hate this,” Estella Ho said of the policemen’s photo.

Even President Benigno Aquino III, who was nowhere to be found at the height of the hostage crisis, became the subject of furious Hong Kong residents.

He was seen in another photo grinning while inspecting the bus hijacked by dismissed Senior Insp. Rolando Mendoza.

Two of the three photos were posted on the Facebook account of a certain Kay Kay Lau. Most of the comments were written in Chinese characters, apparently made by Chinese citizens angry at the senseless death of their eight compatriots on Monday.

“The smiling President in times of crisis. The government only really cares on how to steal money. Thank you for voting [for] this guy (sarcasm),” Harvey Aw commented.

But Filipinos where similarly angered by the picture-taking sessions at the site of the latest international embarrassment for the Philippines.

One version of the photo of the college girls carried the caption: “No wonder the Chinese are mad.” Another version contained expletives.

Sen. Ramon “Bong” Revilla Jr. Wednesday said he had asked Director Leocadio Santiago of the National Capital Region Police Office to have the bus moved out of Rizal Park in Manila.

“We should not make light of the situation. It will just fan the fire. We should be sensitive to what happened. It’s not right that the bus was turned into a tourist spot,” Revilla said in a statement.

The bus was transferred Wednesday to a police camp.

On Tuesday, the Senate adopted a resolution expressing sympathies for the victims of the hostage drama. The committee on justice and human rights is set to include the incident in its hearing on the torture of a robbery suspect at a Tondo police precinct.
“The Senate will also ensure that there will be no whitewash or cover-ups and that those who shall be found erring will be dealt with by the full force of the law,” senators said in the resolution.

Revilla was set to file a separate resolution directing appropriate committees to inquire into the hostage drama.

Sen. Manny Villar would also ask the committees on economic affairs, trade and commerce, and public order and illegal drugs to “look into the effects of the televised hostage-taking incident on the country’s business environment, the investment climate and the economy in general.”

Sen. Juan Miguel Zubiri found in the hostage drama an opportunity to revive debates on the revival of the death penalty law.

“What can Congress do to at least minimize or deter the commission of such crimes? Should we restore the death penalty to deter these crimes? Let the debates begin,” Zubiri said in a statement.

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Old 08-26-2010, 11:42 AM
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Angry messages from China flood Aquino’s Facebook

By Eliza Victoria, Norman Bordadora
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 02:24:00 08/26/2010

MANILA, Philippines—Angry messages from Hong Kong residents flooded the official Facebook page of President Benigno Aquino III hours after Monday night’s hostage drama that claimed the lives of eight tourists from the Chinese territory.

More than 663 comments about the hostage drama were posted on Aquino’s wall as of 6:10 p.m. Wednesday, many of which were critical about the handling of the crisis.

A number commented on Mr. Aquino’s smile at a press conference he called at around midnight of Monday, more than three hours after the hostage crisis ended.

“Shame on you, you were smiling in the press conference, the whole world has witnessed what the police and SWAT did. No more HK people traveling to the Philippines,” Cliff Cheung said.

Sacked policeman Rolando Mendoza hijacked a busload of Hong Kong tourists in a crazed bid to get his job back. Eight of the passengers were killed when commandos attempted to storm the bus more than 10 hours into the ordeal.

Apology

Amid the criticisms raining down on him, Mr. Aquino on Wednesday issued an apology.

“If I offended certain people, I apologize to them. Obviously, there was no joy in attending to that situation,” the President said at a news conference, the second he had given since the hostage drama ended in tragedy.

He asked for understanding from the people of Hong Kong after Facebook members in the Chinese territory called him “a dog” and urged him to resign in connection with published images that showed him smiling while inspecting a bus where the tourists died.

Mr. Aquino said his smile might have been misunderstood. “I have several expressions. I smile when I’m happy. I smile when I’m faced with a very absurd situation where I cannot vent my own emotions,” he said.

Kimberly Chiu Po Yee appealed to Mr. Aquino to get serious and train the police. “Don’t smile in front of the camera after a tragedy has happened,” she said.

Commented Ca Phil: “Just note that we are angry because he is the one who is not respecting us! People are dead, and how dare he smile while he is doing [his so-called apology]? That’s what we can’t ever accept! We don’t want to be harsh on you guys or even on your president, but we are very very very angry with this!”

Steve Lai expressed his hate. “Why did you smile in the press conference? Do you know what you are doing, idiot? Your incompetent policemen and government claimed at least eight precious lives!”

Be serious

Norris Kan, who lives in Hong Kong, said he had great respect for Mr. Aquino. “Now I am so disappointed that you can still be smiling during the press conference and on the scene after ten (sic) hostages were killed on the bus Wednesday because of the extremely bad action of your police force.

“I am also angry that your government and police force did not do their best to protect the Hong Kong people in the hijacking. It is a sad day for Hong Kong and a lot of people are crying today. Please be serious and I really hope that you can give us an apology and incident report ASAP,” Kan said.

Anna Yeung said she thought Mr. Aquino felt no regret for the tragedy because he was smiling when he was reporting about it and when he inspected the crime scene.

The President visited the crime scene in Rizal Park and took a close look at the bus on Tuesday.

John Chea called Mr. Aquino “useless,” while Kit Cheung said he was “not suitable for the position” and should just step down.

Howard Ng asked, “Most of the Hong Kong people do not hate Filipino people. We are just very angry with your president and police force. Just think about it, is that the police force you want?”

Some netizens focused on the impact the crisis, which was televised around the world, would have on the Philippines’ reputation internationally.

“(T)ransmitted live via satellite show all over the world: The police so dumb and lack of skill, equipment and training etc.,” Albert Au wrote.

Several Filipino Facebook users stepped in in an effort to stop the war of words. However, Enrique Alejandro G. Delacour just made things worse by insulting an entire nation: “Why even bother trying to ‘make a statement’ by cursing our President when you can’t even speak proper English you ignorant Chinese c**ts?”

He continued: “Clearly he isn’t directly responsible for the tragedies that unfolded Wednesday [Monday], and yet has still expressed his deepest condolences to those victimized by psychopaths (which I may add are present in every country and I’m certain are in relative abundance in your “amazing” city of Hong Kong).

“We as a people cannot be held directly responsible for the actions of one impulsive decision made by an individual who is clearly not in a stable state of mind at the time of the occurrence,” he added.

“If you want to insult someone, have a go at the real criminals and not express prejudice and derogatory remarks to our President and our nation.”

Melo Ponce de Leon said a whole country should not be blamed for one very unfortunate incident.

“It could happen to anyone, anywhere! The President has already given his apology. I feel sorry for the victims of this incident, but most of all I feel sorry for the small-minded people who keep on talking and would rather incite violence!” De Leon said.
As the hours passed, however, heads seemed to have cooled and the hatred was replaced by sympathy, words of condolence and a call for prayers.

“I feel very sorry for the deceased, not only for my fellow Hong Kong citizens, but for the hostage-taker as well,” said Georgina Fung.

“This tragedy was completely caused by the corrupted police force and authority of your country. Your fellow Filipino people do deserve a better Philippines with justice and peace,” Fung said.

Several, Hong Kong nationals and Filipinos alike, posted the messages “My deepest condolence and prayers to the families of the victims” and “Let us pray for the souls of the victims who died in the tragedy.”

Sense of understanding

Mr. Aquino said he understood the Hong Kong people’s outrage, which has been expressed through protests in front of the Philippine Consulate in the territory and in a much large scale through Facebook and Twitter.

“We ask for their sense of understanding. None of us wanted this,” said the President, who declared Wednesday a national day of mourning in solidarity with the people of Hong Kong and the bereaved families of the dead.

He said Philippine authorities wanted the safety of the hostages more than anything else. “Our primary consideration was the hostages,” he said.

In his own Facebook account, Mr. Aquino called on Filipinos to refrain from needlessly engaging critics in the social networking site.

“We have already read and heard many complaints and opinions by our countrymen and even affected foreigners. May we request that we refrain from engaging in these debates if it is unnecessary,” he said on his Facebook wall.

“Let us show that we Filipinos know how to respect and understand. Thank you very much,” he added.

Administrators of President’s Facebook site decided to delete Wednesday night slanderous and defamatory posts, offensive comments, cuss words and racial insults, below-the-belt attacks and allegations against anyone or any company and advertisements or links to any person, group or company. With a report from Agence France-Presse
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