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Filipino "Juicy Bar" girls in Seoul, Korea - Denied as 'Entertainers' by Philippines

  
Pinoys in South Korea Thread, Filipino "Juicy Bar" girls in Seoul, Korea - Denied as 'Entertainers' by Philippines in Working or Living Abroad; Philippines denies work permits for "entertainers" aspiring to become "juicy bar" girls in Korea Hanopolis Feb 5, 2010 (1st photo) ...
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Old 06-26-2010, 11:11 AM
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Default Filipino "Juicy Bar" girls in Seoul, Korea - Denied as 'Entertainers' by Philippines

Philippines denies work permits for "entertainers" aspiring to become "juicy bar" girls in Korea


Hanopolis Feb 5, 2010







(1st photo) Filipinas at a "juicy bar" in The Ville, outside
Camp Casey, S Korea; (2nd photo) A sign posted at one
of the "juicy bars"; (3rd photo) A "juicy bar" girl flirts with
the camera


According to Yonhap, it appears that aspiring "juicy bar" girls in the Philippines will have a tougher time obtaining work permits to Korea. Apparently, the Filipino government doesn't want innocent girls "falling victim" to prostitution, the Stars and Stripes newspaper reported, Thursday.

But in this day and age, it's difficult to believe anyone seeking to work at a bar near an American military base in Korea is not aware that prostitution may be involved, indeed, is involved. No one, except perhaps the Filipino government who's least of all interested in painting their citizens in anything less than wholesome light.

Reported Yonhap: "The Stars and Stripes, a newspaper for U.S. forces overseas, said that the government in Manila has decided to reject requests from recruiters seeking authorization of Filipino women to work at the so-called 'juicy bars' prevalent near U.S. military bases in Songtan, Dongducheon, Osan, Pyeongtaek and elsewhere."

"These Filipino bar workers are hired to serve U.S. service members and talk them into buying them expensive juice drinks in exchange for their continued company and conversation. Those who failed to meet their juice-sale quotas are often the subject of 'bar fines', meaning they must sell sex to customers to make up the shortfall.

"After securing 'entertainer visas' from South Korea, these women must get their proposed employment contracts approved by the Philippines government.

"Many of these women actually come to Korea believing they are being hired to sing and dance, rather than sell drinks, let alone sex, to U.S. servicemembers, according to the Philippine Embassy."

But then, of course, what else could the Philippine Embassy say? That their entertainers are really prostitutes?

In any case, following the Philippine government clampdown, the number of bar workers traveling to Korea has purportedly dropped by 40 percent. Nevertheless, as water seeks its own level and demand seeks its own supply, Filipino "entertainers" have only been replaced by women from elsewhere, such as Russia, according to My Sister's Place, a non-profit organization who also apparently believes that "juicy bar" girls are "forced" into prostitution.

But once again, come on, who are we kidding here? Forced into prostitution? It would seem very unlikely.
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  #2  
Old 07-10-2010, 09:18 PM
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Default Re: Filipino "Juicy Bar" girls in Seoul, Korea - Denied as 'Entertainers' by Philippi

naku dami nyan dito sa korea.. di na ko nanibago
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Old 07-14-2010, 07:34 PM
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Default Re: Filipino "Juicy Bar" girls in Seoul, Korea - Denied as 'Entertainers' by Philippi

ay ganon pala........
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Old 10-18-2012, 04:27 AM
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Default Re: Filipino "Juicy Bar" girls in Seoul, Korea - Denied as 'Entertainers' by Philippines

Outside US bases, former bar workers fight sex trafficking

02-27-2012 20:10
This is the second of a two-part series that explores the shady relationship between the military and the sex industry in Korea. ― ED.

By Kim Young-jin

PYEONGTAEK, Gyeonggi Province - When Klarys (an alias), a 27-year-old from the Philippines, applied to come to Korea on an entertainment visa, she envisioned herself doing what she always wanted ― singing onstage.

But she says the E-6 visa was taken by her Korean promoter upon arrival and that the vision rapidly began to slip away. And very quickly, she says, so did control over her life.

The club she was taken to outside a U.S. military installation had little to do with music. Rather, she said it was a gateway to a seedy industry of entertaining soldiers ― a world where activists claim sex trafficking is not uncommon.

“For me, it was an opportunity to go abroad,” Klarys told The Korea Times. “But I got here and I was dancing on a pole. We were forced to go out (and have sex with) with whoever. You can’t say no.”

U.S. soldiers walk by bars in an entertainment district outside Osan Air Base in Songtan, Gyeonggi Province where foreign workers, mostly from the Philippines, are hired by local promoters to entertain them, Thursday. Some former workers in the clubs are working to file lawsuits after they say they were victims of human trafficking. / Korea Times


Klarys, who now lives in a shelter for sex trafficking victims in this city south of Seoul, is among a number of Filipina women filing lawsuits against their former promoters and bar owners, who they say maintain a system of deception and intimidation that leads to prostitution.

The amount of prostitution ― forced or otherwise ― at such locales is a major point of debate, with some law enforcement officials insisting the activities hardly exist anymore. Still, activists maintain that the justice system is sweeping the issue under the rug as part of “longstanding patronage of prostitution for the U.S. military.”

Addressing the problem, they say, would not only help alleviate trafficking, but represent an important step for the nation if it wants to become more hospitable to migrant women.

Prostitution ― widespread in Korea ― has long been an issue at “camptowns” outside bases such as Osan Airbase and Camp Humphreys in Songtan and Pyeongtaek, and Camp Casey in Dongducheon as a remnant of the 1950-53 Korean War.

In the decades following the war, scholars and former Korean prostitutes say the Korean government encouraged the activities as a source of hard currency and a safeguard against the U.S. leaving the country.

But with the nation’s economic rise, the jobs have largely been outsourced to foreign women, now mostly Filipinas, said You Young-nim, director of My Sister’s Place, a group that offers them counseling.

She estimated that thousands of them now work in “juicy bars” outside the bases, saying soldiers ― despite the military’s “zero-tolerance policy” toward prostitution ― buy glasses of juice in order to spend time, flirt and dance with the women. Those women who fail to meet a quota for juice sales are often subject to “bar fines,” meaning they are told to sell their body to account for the shortfall, she said.

“These women can’t reach out to programs because of their agencies, who maintain careful control over them,” she said.

In 2003, Seoul halted its issuance of a dancer’s visa ― granted to Russians and others ― as it became a thorny diplomatic issue amid international complaints that those who were brought here with the visa were being exploited for prostitution. The move raises questions over why the E-6 visa is still being issued for the so-called “juicy girls,” according to Ms. You.

‘Nobody explains the situation’

According to United Nations protocol, human trafficking includes the recruitment and transportation of persons by means of coercion or deception for the purpose of exploitation including prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation.

Park Su-mi, director of My Sister’s Home, a shelter for sex trafficking victims, said the trafficking begins when the women are still in the Philippines, where locals work with Korean promoters to recruit and deploy them. “Nobody explains to them the situation in Korea. Their contract does not comprehensively tell what it will be like,” she said.

The women, many single mothers, go through a rigorous process before receiving the visa that includes an audition by a local agency and making an audition tape to be reviewed by the Korea Media Rating Board, activists say.

While many are said to know of such conditions before signing up for the temporary visas, some say they are shocked to learn of the conditions. Others expect that they may have to sit with customers after singing, a practice seen in Japan.

Some say they are promised monthly salaries of around $950 but in reality most of the money is tied to the quota system. Those who protest having sex with customers are threatened to be sent to worse-off establishments and withheld pay if they fail to meet their quotas.

A 28-year-old named Jasmine (an alias) said once she was pressured to take drugs to overcome her shyness and taunted of being a “virgin” before she was pulled aside for her first bar fine. “I wanted to kill myself. I tried to,” she recalled, crying.

Tough battle

Despite such testimony, some are doubtful over whether trafficking or even prostitution takes place at juicy bars, leading to debate over the allegations.

A senior police officer at Dongducheon Police Station, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said that because NGOs regularly visit the clubs, the women should know how to get help if forced into prostitution.

Park, the shelter director, dismissed the claim, saying that even with help numbers to call women may be hesitant to do so, fearing further action from the bar owners. She said in the past, recruiters in the Philippines have stepped in with threats to reveal their situation to family members, adding that the owners are well-networked and hold political sway.

She said by assisting former club workers such as Klarys and Jasmine file lawsuits, she hoped to one day set a legal precedent for future cases and get investigators to better understand the intricacies of the subject.

For Klarys, the challenge could be particularly steep as the Uijeongbu Prosecutor’s Office has already declined to pick up the case, though she plans to appeal. The prosecutor said it remained “disputable” whether she had been forced into prostitution, saying her claim had been made on her own “internal assessment,” according to official records.

It also cited testimony from two former bar workers ― at least one of whom knew the plaintiff ― who said the allegations were false.

Park questioned whether the investigation had been conducted fairly, saying Klarys had been questioned while the accused ― the bar owner and promoter ― and others were present, creating a confrontational, intimidating environment. She also pointed out the witnesses were still employed by Klarys’ former employer and that he was likely exerting control over them.

Former bar worker Jasmine said she would press on in a bid to win support for her son, who she had after a relationship with a soldier she met on the job. The father has moved on without offering child support, she said.

She hoped to send a message to Filipinas back home over the visa. “Be careful to come here,” she said. “Don’t fall into the same situation as I did.”
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Old 10-18-2012, 04:42 AM
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Default Re: Filipino "Juicy Bar" girls in Seoul, Korea - Denied as 'Entertainers' by Philippines

An American GI in Korea apparently thinks this article is just a media bull sh*t bashing US military. He argues those "Juicy Bar" girls know what they get themselves into when they come to Korea to work in those bars.


GI Korea on February 28th, 2012 at 7:25 am
Do Juicy Girls Really Not Know What They Are Getting Themselves Into?

Via a reader tip in the Open Thread comes this latest prostitution article in the Korea Times. It seems like every couple of years some Korean reporter recycles the same prostitution and human trafficking angle to bash USFK with:

When Klarys (an alias), a 27-year-old from the Philippines, applied to come to Korea on an entertainment visa, she envisioned herself doing what she always wanted ― singing onstage.
But she says the E-6 visa was taken by her Korean promoter upon arrival and that the vision rapidly began to slip away. And very quickly, she says, so did control over her life.
The club she was taken to outside a U.S. military installation had little to do with music. Rather, she said it was a gateway to a seedy industry of entertaining soldiers ― a world where activists claim sex trafficking is not uncommon.
“For me, it was an opportunity to go abroad,” Klarys told The Korea Times. “But I got here and I was dancing on a pole. We were forced to go out (and have sex with) with whoever. You can’t say no.” [Korea Times]
Considering how long women from the Philippines have been coming to Korea she likely knew full well she was going to be working in a sleazy bar. As far as prostitution she can say no but the way the club system is set up she will likely make no money if she can’t sell the drinks:
She estimated that thousands of them now work in “juicy bars” outside the bases, saying soldiers ― despite the military’s “zero-tolerance policy” toward prostitution ― buy glasses of juice in order to spend time, flirt and dance with the women. Those women who fail to meet a quota for juice sales are often subject to “bar fines,” meaning they are told to sell their body to account for the shortfall, she said.
I usually say read the rest at the link but don’t bother because it is more of the same of juicy girls saying they were virgins before coming to Korea and expecting to sing and dance and not be involved in prostitution which then forced them to get hooked on drugs. If you can believe it they make a claim that is all the girls from the Philippines that go to Japan, sing and dance and are not involved in prostitution. So the article is the typical media BS to bash USFK with when the solution to human trafficking is quite simple, get the ROK government to stop issuing the entertainer visas to women in the Philippines. But wait that would also dry up the far larger supply of Filippinas sent to work in Korean brothels, which the article makes no mention of.

I continue to maintain that the best way to handle the issue of human trafficking is to put clubs that hire third country nationals off limits. Most of the Filipina’s working in these clubs know what they are getting into and human trafficking in general has been greatly reduced in Korea in recent years. However, as long Filipinas are working in juicy bars there will continue to the perception of human trafficking that will follow USFK that the media will continue to jump on. By forcing the bars to employ Korean workers it would pretty much make the human trafficking issue go away because Korean nationals would be much harder to traffic in. The people that will lose if bars with 3rd country nationals are put off limits are the bar owners that will make less money because they will have to pay Korean women more money for doing the same thing these Filipina women are doing.
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